Travels with Gurudas in Europe

Travels with Gurudas in Europe

By Gurudas, edited by Anata Sesa das

Bhakta Chaitanya Swami met me in Montreal for a festival of India, and he invited me to the summer festival in Lithuania. Since I experienced other festivals in The Ukraine, and Czech Republic, I agreed to go with him. At the other festivals, I was impressed with the enthusiasm, discipline and receptiveness of the participants. 
As a result, I asked if I could go to the Czech Republic as well. I had visited there four times previously, and had many friends in that part of the world. The trip was arranged, and the challenges in traveling became lighter due to the grace and mercy of Krishna and Prabhupada.

I met Prabhupada when he came west. Working together, we started, formed, and built the beginning foundation of Krishna consciousness in the Western world and then internationally. We started with nothing– just the Swamiji. We had no tulsi beads, mridanga’s, kartals, prayers books, elders to learn from, no movement, no money or anything. What we had was the Swami who gave us the Vedic culture. Prabhupada once said, ” I gave them something tangible–the Vedic culture.”

As I experienced Krishna’s love inside and out, I wished to give both Radha and Krishna’s love to everyone. This love is present whenever I see new temples, with old familiar photos of my parampara gurus, beautiful decorated Deities, and Prabhupada sitting there regally. I feel that divine love in other places half way around the world when devotees speak the same language through prayers, bhajans, kirtans and service attitudes.

Prabhupada gave me the principal das anu das, which means, we serve each other with love. Due to this principle, I want to see the successes of my spiritual family.
 Therefore, when I see progress such as Govinda’s restaurants, bakeries, farms,  prasadam factories, beekeepers, children, people hugging, people smiling, people ecstatically dancing with an attitude to serve,  it brings joy to my heart.
 In spite of growing pains, and some mismanagement, I see ongoing progress of Krishna consciousness in the West.

This was the wish of Bhaktivinoda Thakura and Bhakti Siddhanta Saraswati. The essence is the same as when Lord Chaitanya Mahaprabhu changed people’s lives through the Maha Mantra. His efforts brought the holy names to every town, village and country. All of this was accomplished because of A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, and it is still going on


.

After landing in Latvia, we were met with smiles respect and garlands. We rode to Riga, where I was greeted with a kirtan party, and given a tour of the Riga Krishna temple. The building included a restaurant, an ayurvedic clinic, residential quarters for men and woman, and a very nice room for me. I was informed by the lovely lady hostess, that my Braja brother Dina Bandhu would be sleeping across from me later that night. Old friends and new friends are met on these magical Krishna tours.

The next morning, we piled into a van with Dina Bandhu, His assistant Arjun, the wife of the driver and his child sat in the front seat, and other devotee girls sat in the back seats. We stopped and had a prasadam picnic near a sea-side resort. We explored the resort, and then went on to Vilnius, Lithuania. Once again, we were greeted by a kirtan party (just like the old days). I was escorted to a very nice suite. It had one room with a desk, couch, and table. There was also a kitchen and sleeping quarters. The site had workshop rooms, p

ools and saunas. A lake and forest were nearby.
While in Latvia, I had two assistants assigned to me.

The next morning, Bhavananda, one of the assistants, took me to me to a large tent wherein about 800 devotees were ecstatically chanting and dancing. It contained an altar with all our inspirations decorated beautifully. There were also altars on the side.

While there, I proposed several seminars:
1) “Prabhupada is with us”
2) “Every town and village” {the history of Krishna Consciousness in the Western World}
3) “Krishna Consciousness is a great and joyful adventure”.


I spoke morning, evening and in between, while the younger devotees lapped up the nectar like kittens. The various Swamis also appreciated the talks, and asked questions from me. This is a list of the Maharajas present: Shubha Swami,
Dhirashanta Swami (He was with me as a bramachari during the early days in Vrindavan), Niranjan Swami, Sat Chid Ananda Swami, Chaitanya Swarup Swami, Chaitanya Swami, and Dina Bandhu.

The morning kirtans involved lively dancing and nourishing holy names. There were also gifts presented by many, including some artists. Kunda data devi dasi (Kamile Tamosulnaite) gave me some art etchings as a gift.

We rode to Riga with a nice family. The driver was a gifted astrologer and palmist; while his mother was an elderly devotee. Another bright-faced Bramacharini squeezed in. As we entered Riga, and crossed the river, I saw the old and new towns. The temple was in a great location. Kirtan and smiling devotees greeted me again in Riga. In fact, warm welcomes seemed to great us at each placw we visited.

I gave the evening class.  As someone in Britain once said, “Gurudas mixes Prabhupada and Krishna.” When I discuss Prabhupada as a person, I speak of his courage, humor, wit, intelligence, compassion, and open mindedness. The third generation of devotees only know Prabhupada through his wonderful writings. Many realizations come from this awesome and instructive perspective, so when they see Prabhupada in his personal way, they understand his real greatness. They see that he practiced the shastras daily, and they see how he manifested the Vedic culture in the modern materialistic world. People say that “my realization and flavor of Krishna Consciousness has changed for the better,” and “I feel you have brought Prabhupada to us.”

Most of the Eastern European devotees lived under strict totalitarian regimes, they already lived simply, and so they eagerly accept the simple living and high thinking, as well as the exoticness of the Krishna consciousness philosophy.


We went early to the airport, where we took Ryan airlines to Prague (or Narayan airlines, as we like to say). In Prague, we met some old friends and recorded a few bhajans such as “Gauranga Bolite Habe”, “Gurudev Kripa”, “Nitaipada Kamala”, and the “Hare Krishna Maha Mantra”. After the recording session, I gave a class at the Prague temple.

Jay Gurudev, a College Professor, arranged for me to stay in a college facility in a room overlooking a running track and footbal field. The Prague skyline could be seen in the distance as soaring swallows zipped near the window.

The next day, I had breakfast with Prema Priya and Puniya  Palika . Their daughter was getting married in a few weeks. After breakfast, Puniya Palika and I walked through a green park and past an old monastery. Then we got on the bus (they don’t charge seniors) and rode to a Krishna temple in Prague. At the temple, I met Sridhar Swami from Poland, who was at Chestahova in 1976 when Avenesh Chandra, Bhakti Bhibhava Swami, Suhotra and I were there. Chitrashekar was also present.

A photographer from Poland picked us up in a car, and we rode to the riverside docks. Puniya Palika arranged a boat ride. Then we met Captain Milan, and meandered peacefully in the middle of the river. This allowed us to see Prague, the beautiful city of towers, from another perspective. Thank you Krishna for opening doors, introducing me to people, allowing me to serve, and taking me on boat rides.

The next day I saw my old friends from Prague, and I gave the Sunday love feast talk. One of the old friends at the Prague temple was Kate, who ran a hotel castle, and theater. She is probably going to live at the Prague farm to continue her devotional life.

Padapangana took us to Nava Sady, a village where many devotee families live and work at the Damodar prasadam, catering and manufacturing plant. I was given a tour of a building next door that was new since the last visit. Panga told me of a big factory in a nearby town that was a possible site for the Vedic Care Charity (www.VedicCare.org).

I usually stayed with Lila Purosshattam, but Stitha Krishna Swami was staying there, so I stayed with Pada Panga and his family. They showed me before and after photos of the temple. There were two abhisheks, and one julan ceremony taking place. Maharaja and I sat on the vyas together. I like him because he is genially humble, curious and scholarly.

During the morning class on Janmashtami, the devotees asked me what quality of Srila Prabhupada impressed me the most? I responded, “His mercy”, and everyone laughed. Then I spoke about Prabhupada’s forgiveness, mercy, and inclusiveness. My friend, Shymananda, gave me a Venu Gita by Shivaram Swami that I read on the ride. I enjoyed devouring the nectar just in time for Janmashtami.

Padapankija told me that he bought another building in a nearby town, and asked if I would like to see it for a possible care facility. Purroshattam, Stitha Krishna Swami, Shymananda, Puniya Palika and I rode to the factory building. It is huge and can have many uses. We again talked about using the building as a care for devotees facility. Such a facility could house a school, care rooms, and a multi-faceted healing center (which could include Vedic arts and culture healing workshops). There would also be room for administrative offices and an organic farm plot. We will see what Radha Krishna have planned for us.

After the Vyas Puja feast, we rode to the Prague  Krsna Dvir farm with my good friends Pada Pankaja, Puniya Palika, and Shyamanada. We stopped at a Govinda’s restaurant in a nearby town and I saw my old friend Lilla Shakti, wife of Priya Kirti. She ran over and embraced me. Their son, Vamsi, smiled and greeted me.
He had two ice creams with umbrellas, and I always have a gift for him, so we made a paper car and boat. Later, I remembered how to make a paper airplane for him. I discovered that the Govinda’s restaurant also fed homeless people after closing.

I stayed with a wonderful family: Keshava Puri, Yoga Mayyee and Bhakta Mayee. Bhakta Mayee was a special child, who also warmed up to me as I was playful with her. They were formal at first, but soon they relaxed and we became a family, which I considered a great compliment. They took me to a Castle on the way to the post office. Deena Bhandu was arriving, so we reunited at a lunch from the devotees that run the Balaram restaurant in Prague.

On Sunday, I was visited by Martin Bursik, the minister of the Environment in the Czech Republic, and his wife.  Two other friends happened by. Ladislav Heryan , or Ladin as he is known, is a priest for the youth, and the other was a priestess from the Ukraine.

I opened up the Trutnov Open Air Music Festival with them two years earlier. She held the Ukrainian flag, and a 32-person kirtan band appeared on stage. We reminisced and exchanged many ideas. Martin had once met the Dalai Lama, and had a ring given to him. When their child chimed in sweetly I said, “She is the future.” They excitedly said, “That is what the Dalai Lama said to her also.” We proposed to form a gathering with the theme “Spirituality and the Environment”, and invited the Dalai Lama as well.

I am especially fond of Priya Kirti and family and we talked about starting a Vedic care project over lunch prasadam. Kesava Puri drove us back to Prague, I stayed at the college and gave two classes at the Prague temple, and a love feast with Nara Hari and Maha Duti Swami.

The next day, at the Airportin Belgium, there was a terrorist alert and I had to move through security twice. Finally, I spied a tilak and a devotee wearing it, and he helped out with suitcases. We rode through the Belgium countryside and a WW II battlefield before arriving at Radhadesh. Aradhana, who so expertly arranged everything, was meeting me from England. She is very thoughtful and expert, so the classes, meetings and tours at Radhadesh were paced nicely.

In fact, she facilitated my whole trip wonderfully. I toured the wood furnace, solar heating, the guesthouses, seminar hall, restaurant, boutique bakery, art gallery and museum.


Bhagavati, a wonderfully intelligent and competent devotee, has already been assisting devotees who died in Radhadesh. She is maintaining a room in cooperation with us at the Vedic Care. She is a devotee of Kadana Kanana Swamiji, who I had met before, (so another old Swamiji friend–there are so many). He sings like an angel and has overcome many obstacles by Krishna’s protection and Grace.

Ram das and Dhiti Dasi, artists from California, were teaching an art class and we became friends. Other devotees, such as President Manohar das and Mahaprabu were hospitable. We had some meetings regarding care for devotees as a possible college course. Eventually.  Dina Dayal, the director of the Bhaktivedanta College, took me on a tour to nearby rock formations.

We met with Bhagavati many times in an attempt to secure our plan to continue her service of care.  She had served three dying devotees recently, and it is important to secure more rooms for this purpose.

 Aradhana and I rode the train to London. It was a pleasant and easy ride from St. Pancreas station to London. My friend Yasodananda was there and greeted us.
That night, there was a house gathering with more Prabhupada katha.

The next morning, we attended a Srimad Bhagvatam class at Sri Sri London Iswara temple in Soho. Aradhana arranged a two-day filming with Barnaby at Birkbeck University, followed by an evening gathering

 on Radhastami in London. Deena Bandhu gave me his last copy of Vraja lilla and I gave a two-hour talk during which I read from Bhakti Rasamirtra Sindhu, Venu Gita and the Vraja lilla. I shared how Radaharani is the giver of compassion, and manifested Vrindavan for Krishna’s pleasure, and her wonderful qualities.

After some more filming, we took a train to Elstree and lunch at Sri Kama’s and Kishore’s. Then we visited Bhaktivedanta Manor, George’s garden, and did some filming in Prabhupada’s rooms. We then met with Gaura and talked about how they would adopt care for elderly devotees.  He also proposed a book launch tour for my up-coming book of my classic photos of A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami.

An evening gathering at Gangamata’s Gauidiya Math was very nice.
 I had a morning meeting with Rama Narishima, Aradhana, and Radha Priya dd.
Then we traveled to Gatwick, where as usual, my competent wearer of many hats helped rearrange suitcases crammed with many gifts and appreciations.

As always, it is rewarding to bring Prabhupada’s compassion, mercy, humor, flexibility, adventurous curiosity, and open mindedness to many. One can witness the transformation as the flavor of Krishna changes from the awesome and stern instruction to real personalism, love and understanding of how it began.
I watched as stoic faces changed into smiles, tears and laughter as they met Swamiji. This is my and our legacy.

Intelligence or Chaos

A book by Hari Krishna Das (Henk Keilman)

Chapter 1
The mystery of existence

“The most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible at all” Albert Einstein

Unimaginably large numbers!

When I look out of the window of my study to the world outside, I see the world as we know it. I see trees, gardens and buildings in bright sunlight, except for the shadow of the occasional cloud passing overhead. Around me, life is taking its course. Nothing remarkable, as you might say; everything is just as we know it. However, behind this everyday reality is a universe of an almost unimaginable size and complexity.

We can forget this universe so easily in our daily routine of work, grocery shopping and enjoying our free time, but it is nevertheless always present, just behind that blue or cloudy sky, and it is full of truly astonishing phenomena. Take the phenomenon of light for example, which makes all life on this planet possible. It is only because of light that we can actually see anything of the world around us, yet rarely do we consider that this light has just made a huge cosmic journey simply to get here. Emanating from what we call the sun, a relatively small star known as a ‘yellow dwarf’ in astronomer’s jargon, the light that reaches our planet earth has traveled 150 million kilometers at a speed of about 300,000 kilometers per second taking roughly just 8 minutes to complete the journey.

The sun may be small compared to other stars, but the force that she produces is still unimaginably powerful. Every second our star produces an amount of energy that equals the explosion of 1 trillion hydrogen bombs of 1 megaton. In this same second, the sun produces enough energy to keep the entire world economy going for 500,000 years based on our current energy usage. Due to the enormous amounts of energy being produced and the speed at which it travels, we can feel the influence of the sun almost immediately despite her distance from earth. On a hot summer’s day, her heat can be unbearable and we are grateful just to find a spot in the shade.

However, the sun is only a glowing pin-head compared to the total size of the universe. To be really impressed by the cosmos, we have to wait until the sun disappears behind the horizon and darkness sets in. After sunset, the true scale of the universe becomes more apparent as numerous stars, star systems and other celestial bodies appear in the night sky. For those of us not living in towns and cities and not hindered by light pollution the night sky would be filled with thousands of stars. Nonetheless, no matter how impressive a view, we would only be witnessing a tiny part of the entire universe, a fraction of a fraction of an immeasurably large space.

Our solar system with its 8 planets Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

For those who really want to understand the universe we have to enter the domain of extremely large numbers. The distances within our own solar system are already enormous. Earth is part of a collection of nine planets, including the lonely outer dwarf planet Pluto. The distance from the sun to Pluto is, on average, 5 billion kilometers. If we were to travel by spaceship at the impressive speed of 60,000 kilometers per hour, then we would need to travel for 10 years to cover this distance. But if we zoom out further, then our solar system disappears into nothing. Our collection of planets is a minuscule part of a much larger entity; a galaxy called the Milky Way. The distance from one side of this system to the other side is 100,000 light years. One light year is the distance that light travels in one year at the speed of 300.000 km per second, or 9.4 trillion (9,400,000,000,000) kilometers. If we continued to travel in the spaceship that took us to Pluto at the same speed, it would take us 1.8 billion years to travel from one side of the Milky Way to the other.

Nevertheless, we would still be safely within our own star system. However, if we ventured to travel to our next nearest major star system, the Andromeda galaxy, then we would have to cover a distance of 2.4 million light years. If we continued to travel at this same speed, it would take us no less than 43.2 billion years! These distances are simply beyond human comprehension. We can hardly pronounce such numbers, let alone imagine them. Who does not, from time to time, look up to the stars in the sky and wonder with slight apprehension where it all ends?

The Andromeda star system is located at a distance of 2,4 million lightyears from our solar system.

As large as the universe is, however, so the inhabitants of this planet appear to be insignificant and small, and I am not just referring to our size. One only has to watch CNN to be faced with the crude facts; a civil war raging in one part of the world, some bomb attacks in another part, which is pretty much a daily menu of news facts. Of course, we also invent medication, we build sea walls and dams to protect millions from drowning and we create institutes that advance prosperity and social justice. Art, culture and science are also expressions of human activities, aimed at positive human development. However, looking at our own history, we mostly seem to be specialised in warfare and fighting each other. According to a New York Times article published on July 6 2003, over the past 3,400 years humans have been entirely at peace for just 268 years, or just 8% of recorded history. That means there were wars going on for 3.132 years somewhere on the planet. These wars have claimed between 150 million to 1 billion casualties. That’s not a very good statistic, and it says a lot about the human condition. The relative peace of the past 65 years is mainly due to the existence of nuclear weapons, which make it impossible for us to have large scale wars. While most wars, in hindsight and almost without exception, seem to be useless, a nuclear war is useless in advance. The so-called MAD doctrine of Mutually Assured Destruction is an insurmountable obstacle to any potential aggressor based on even the most primitive calculations.

Nevertheless, smaller wars and battles continue as humans fight a complicated battle in their struggle for survival against real or alleged enemies and threats. This battle is fought with intensive emotions and is literally of vital importance to each individual. But placed into perspective, these great and small human activities take place against the backdrop of nature and the infinite universe. Only one hundred kilometers of atmosphere separate us from the unreal reality of this immeasurable, unimaginable universe. These one hundred kilometers above our earth are the boundaries of the tiny bubble in which earthly existence takes place. This tiny bubble, earth and its atmosphere, floats in an immeasurable ocean of cosmic energies of outright extra-terrestrial proportions.

The difference between the immeasurable universe and human worries is surreal. It is a remarkable contrast; the cold, uninterested magnitude of the universe set against the intense emotions and awareness of our minuscule existence, occurring simultaneously and of course, both equally real. But, what is ‘real’? Why does reality exist? Just like everyone looks at the stars now and then and wonders about the vastness of the universe, everyone will sooner or later also wonder why we exist and why everything around us exists. Sometimes reality seems unreal, intangible and even dreamlike whilst at other times reality feels like a strong and tangible presence. What is most remarkable is that reality appears to be inflexible and it does not seem to be interested in us or our well-being. Both the world and the universe just exist, distant and indifferent; at least so it seems. In the words of Richard Dawkins:

“The universe we observe has precisely the properties we should expect if there is, at bottom, no design, no purpose, no evil no good, nothing but blind, pitiless indifference.”

This causes humans many problems. We wonder, why is there something instead of just nothing? Why does reality exist the way it does? Why is reality at every level so immensely complicated? And why is reality permeated with undesirable things such as old age, disease and death and other types of suffering. Is there an explanation other then the one provided by Dawkins above, or is that it.

These questions lay the foundation for this book. They are the starting-point towards the question that defines the mystery of existence and that is the most important question that humans can ask themselves: Does God exist or not? Does existence – small or gigantic – spring from an unconscious and unintelligent chaos, or is it created by awareness and intelligence and does it have a purpose and a design? The answer to these questions provides an insight into the role and position of humans in the universe. Do our lives have meaning or is our existence toally lacking any purpose? Do humans exist with an intention, or do we just float around in the cosmos without ever achieving anything? Or, as the famous atheist philosopher Bertrand Russell put it so strikingly: “Man is an unfortunate accident, a sideshow in the material universe – an odd accident in a forgotten corner.”

Ultimately, we are of course all interested, out of normal self interest, in our own position and perspective in life. At the deepest level, this perspective is completely determined by the answer to the question of whether God exists or not.

Thanks to: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA
The Andromeda system is situated at an impressive distance of 2.4 million light-years away from us. This distance is nothing compared to the distance to NGC 1300, a spiral-shaped star system that is situated at a distance of 61 million light-years away from us in the Eridanus constellation. The star system has a cross- section of about 110,000 light-years; just slightly bigger than our own Milky Way.

Philosophical analyses has shown that this question, is the determining factor for the way we view reality and the universe. All philosophies can, in the end, be divided into two fundamental categories. The first category is atheistic in its core and states that the origin and the functioning of reality is based on chaos and coincidence. The second category is theistic in its core and regards the universe as an organic reality that was created and is managed by intelligence. Other philosophies that are essentially agnostic – and therefore do not explicitly state whether God exists or not – are often considered to be atheistic. In many cases, they will say that the intelligent coordination of the universe is an improbability. Therefore, they implicitly – and based on elimination – have a preference for chaos and coincidence as the most probable explanation for the origin of the universe.

Of course, within each of these categories there is a huge diversity of philosophies with many differences in nuance. Nonetheless, the dividing line is striking and this has an all-determining effect on all aspects of a philosophy, such as the theory of knowledge (epistemology), the theory on the nature of being (ontology), theories concerning moral values and meaning (ethics) and, in the end, the description or perception of our physical and scientific reality (physics and metaphysics). Indeed, social and political ideologies are also largely defined by this split. Denying or confirming the existence of God therefore leads to opposite philosophies and completely opposite answers as far as the origin and meaning of existence is concerned. Do our lives have a deeper meaning, or are our lives meaningless; a random evolutionary accident? Is man just a product of matter, or is there another type of energy that defines our consciousness and our individuality? Is death the absolute end of our lives, or do our lives continue beyond the boundaries of death? Is there a final heavenly (or hellish) destination past earthly existence, or is our short earthly existence the beginning, middle and end of the story? Theistic or atheistic philosophies will answer these questions in totally opposite ways leading to very different world perspectives which strongly affect everything we think, say and do. Even scientific disciplines such as physics and cosmology are strongly influenced, both directly and indirectly, by the dividing line between atheism and theism. As an interesting side note, it is precisely these sciences, combined with mathematics, that contain the initial answers to the question of whether the universe is governed by chaos or intelligence and thus, whether God exists or not. Given the impact this question has on our life, individually and in society, this really is the most important question that humans can ask themselves.

The images of this rich set of star systems are made by La Silla Observatory of the ESO in Chile. The thousands of star systems that are situated in this small area of the firmament provide us with a look into the distant past of the universe and makes us realise again how enormously large the cosmos is. Just underneath the bright stars in the centre of this image there is a group of star systems called Abell 226. The Abell group is situated at a distance of some billions of light-years away from us. Behind these objects there are even more star systems, they are less bright though, but still at even greater distances of about 9 up to 10 billion light-years. The light we see today coming from these systems has therefore traveled for 9 up to 10 billion years in order to reach us. This also means that we are looking back in time at a universe that existed 10 billion years ago.

This book attempts to answer this question, not by serving dogmas, but by critical analyses, based on philosophical and scientific research. This book compares the scientific and philosophical arguments in favour of the existence of God or against the existence of God and puts atheism against theism, chaos against design. It does this by focusing on some important changes in scientific thought, especially in the area of physics and cosmology where new and completely revolutionary discoveries have been made. These discoveries and insights reveal a universe that is infinitely complex, infinitely organized and infinitely mysterious. The level of organized complexity is so huge that this can only be explained logically by the presence of an all-pervading intelligence and an omnipresent awareness. Such an all-pervading intelligence can be called by any name and each label can be granted to it. God, of course, is the most obvious name: all-pervading intelligence and omnipresent awareness are qualifications that can only be attributed to God. The problem however is that the term God is burdened with a controversial history, created by humans. These are all controversies that, almost without exception, stem from ignorance, sectarianism, fanaticism or a corrupted desire for power. The intention of this book is to demonstrate, based on objective and scientific foundations, that intelligence and consciousness are the driving forces behind the universe, regardless of the burdened history of what that implies. This burdened history is what it is, but it does not alter the reality of these new scientific insights and the philosophical consequences of these insights. Where science directed humanity towards materialism and atheism over the past 200 years, we now see a way of thinking in the opposite direction. This direction is of a spiritual nature and implies a scientific rehabilitation of God. The facts that science has revealed over the past decades confirm that a universe without God is simply untenable, despite desperate and sometimes exotic attempts to do so. If we consider all the arguments, there can only be one logical conclusion: the universe is governed by intelligence and consciousness.

Whether God exists

This, therefore, is the central theme of the book, as the (sub)title indicates: ‘Intelligence or chaos: the misconception of atheism.’ This book discusses the scientific and philosophical arguments for and against the existence of God, atheism versus theism, and in scientific terms, intelligence and design versus chaos and coincidence. There will be few people who do not know the term ‘God’, but on the other hand it is a concept with a wide range of interpretations. Therefore, it is important and necessary to define and describe the concept of God. With respect to this, I do not intend to get caught up in analyses and definitions that are too technical, but I intend to focus on the general, common meaning of the concept God. This meaning is mostly associated with the manner in which the nature and the being of God is described. For instance, is he personal or impersonal; is he one with his creation and the universe or is he transcendental and outside of his creation? Is he personally involved with the universe or is he in control at a distance? What are his qualities and attributes? There are mainly two visions regarding the being and the nature of God, monotheism and monism.

Within these categories are several schools of thought with important nuances and differences, but this book will primarily deal with the core concepts. Monotheism states that one divine Supreme Being exists that has personal, transcendent characteristics. Monotheism also states that the world— the universe— is an emanation and creation of God. According to this vision, both God and his emanations are eternal energies. The Christian doctrine deviates somewhat from this view, since creation is not considered to be an emanation, but as something that was created by God out of nothing. This is called ‘creatio ex nihilo’ by Christian theologians. Here, but also in other aspects, there are nuanced differences between the various monotheistic traditions. What the different monotheistic schools do agree on is the absolute unity of God, which is at its core both personal and transcendental. Within this unity there is, however, a multitude of diversity: first of all, between God and His energies, and accordingly, between His energies mutually. This principle is the essence of monotheism.

In Christianity the unity of God is not entirely without controversy; the doctrine of the Trinity states that God is really three persons, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, and not one person. Effectively, and implicitly most Christian theologians see God as fundamentally One, yet simultaneously many, or three in this instance. Despite this nuance, Christianity is generally accepted as a monotheistic religion. Quoting the words of Jesus in John 5.44: “How can you believe, when you receive glory from one another and you do not seek the glory that is from the one and only God?” Jesus was clearly of the opinion, as was official Jewish doctrine at the time, that God is one.

Richard Dawkins during the launch of his campaign in 2008, where London buses were decorated with atheist slogans.

Monism also states that there is one divine Supreme Being. The difference is, however, that this Supreme Being is impersonal by nature. The monotheistic God is often associated with an impersonal, all-embracing, undifferentiated, and infinite state of pure energy, made of pure and impersonal consciousness. According to monism, it is only this state of absolute unity that is real and the universe, with its diversity and multitude, is just an illusionary reflection of this divine energy.

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are considered to be monotheistic religions. However, despite many misconceptions, Hinduism is also, at its core and by origin, a monotheistic doctrine. The philosophical core of Hinduism is mainly founded on the Vedanta philosophy, which is of a monotheistic nature. On the other hand, Buddhism and certain movements within the Vedanta school, such as Advaita Vedanta, are monistic by nature. The famous Dutch philosopher Spinoza (1632 – 1677) was also a monist who saw the world as the expression of an underlying, all-embracing and impersonal reality. Spinoza identified this underlying reality with God. The doctrine of Spinoza was an important influence on the thinking of Albert Einstein. Einstein believed in Spinoza’s image of God: ‘… a God that revealed Himself in the systematic harmony of the universe’. He did not believe in a God that interfered with the fate and the actions of man.

The two main movements, monotheism and monism have numerous variants such as pantheism, panentheism, polytheism, and deism. The first, pantheism is a variant to monism. According to pantheism, God only manifests Himself in the universe and does not differ from the universe in every respect. Deism and panentheism are sub-divisions of monotheism. Deism is a movement that has been popular amongst Western scientists and emerged as a result the scientific revolution in the 17th century followed by the Enlightenment in Europe and the United States during the 18th century. Deism is a form of monotheism, with the distinction being that the deistic God does not interfere directly in the world, in human affairs and nature. The latter is, according to deism, governed by the laws of nature, which were ultimately created by God. Panentheism is a concept that is perhaps not quite so familiar. It means that God is transcendent and above creation and, at the same time, He is immanent and manifests Himself in creation. Effectively, it is not really different from monotheism, which also acknowledges the simultaneous transcendence and immanence of God. Polytheism, the believe in many gods and goddesses, is sometimes a disguised form of monotheism. The pantheon of gods are effectively demi-gods and part of a divine hierarchy. For instance in Hinduism demi-gods are charged with ruling and managing the universe on behalf of, and in the service of the supreme God. Other traditions such as the polytheism found in ancient Egypt, Greece or Rome are truly polytheistic, whereby the different gods and goddesses are considered to be separate entities each with their own individual powers.

In the following treatment of theism and atheism, I primarily refer to the two main groups of theistic philosophies, which are monotheism and monism. For the sake of convenience, I indicate both traditions in this book as theistic. In later chapters, the differences between these two traditions will be explained further.

In religions and theistic philosophies, in both monotheistic and monistic variants, God is defined as the Supreme Being, almighty, all-knowing, omnipresent, eternal and infinite: the creator and maintainer of the universe and of all life in the universe. Furthermore, God is described as loving and merciful. A theistic world view assumes that such a being, in whatever shape or form, exists. Moreover, this implies that the universe is an organic unity, governed from an intelligent and conscious centre.

The four propositions of atheism

The atheistic world view denies the existence of such a Supreme Being and denies that the universe is an organic unity governed by an intelligent centre. Apart from admitting that there are some basic, blind laws of nature, atheism claims that the universe consists of an infinite number of material particles that reside in an infinite and empty space. Since the particles are fundamentally separated by space, they are independent and therefore on a large scale governed by coincidence and chaos. Atheism also denies the existence of another reality, apart from or next to the material reality. One of the most leading advocates of this worldview is, without question, the ethologist and biologist Richard Dawkins. He even placed atheistic advertisements on London city buses. In his book ‘The God Delusion’ he defines atheism as follows:

“An atheist in this sense of philosophical naturalist is somebody who believes there is nothing beyond the natural, physical world, no supernatural creative intelligence lurking behind the observable universe, no soul that outlasts the body and no miracles – except in the sense of natural phenomena that we don’t yet understand. If there is something that appears to lie beyond the natural world as it is now imperfectly understood, we hope eventually to understand it and embrace it within the natural.“

Another atheistic thinker Dawkins quotes is Julian Baggini. He explains atheism in his book ‘Atheism, A Very Short Introduction’ as follows:

“What most atheists do believe is that although there is only one kind of stuff in the universe and it is physical, out of this stuff come minds, beauty, emotions, moral values – in short the full gamut of phenomena that gives richness to human life.”

Based on these definitions, but also based on the definitions of other atheistic thinkers, atheism is founded on four propositions or basic assumptions:

  1. The universe consists of material particles that exist independent of each other and that move independent of each other within the infinite void. The total of the movements and interactions of these particles is governed by coincidence and chaos, combined with a number of simple and blind laws of nature. This is also called ‘pluralism’.
  2. There is no central intelligent coordination within the universe and the universe is not an organic unity. There exists nothing apart from or outside the perceptible, physical material reality or the world of matter.

Proposition 1 and 2 together are also called ‘materialism’.

3. Even if there were to be a beginning of the universe, the origin of the universe has to be ultimately simple. God is by definition a complex being and, therefore, He cannot be the ultimate cause. The existence of a complex being such as God would demand that He would have been created by something else.

4. The universe is imperfect from a human perspective. That imperfection manifests itself most clearly in the presence of useless suffering that each living creature is faced with. This contradicts and undermines the position of God as almighty and merciful.

The first two propositions together are called ‘materialism’; it holds the view that matter is the only real substance in the universe. In this view, it is also emphasized that matter may be one substance, but that this substance is split up into innumerable particles. These particles are separated from each other by empty space. Materialism states that this combination of material particles and empty space is eternal and that there is a no cause for this.

The third proposition makes an exception to this, since it does state that there is a possible cause of the universe. This proposition claims that, should the universe have a cause at all, then this cause must ultimately be simple. This proposition is very relevant since modern cosmology assumes that the universe did have a beginning and has not always been there, nor will it always be here.

The fourth proposition is the most important one, since in the end most atheistic arguments can be reduced to this, or are indirectly derived from this. Consciously or unconsciously, atheists refer to the issue of the imperfect universe and the suffering in the world as the most probable reason why God could not exist. In the following chapters, the above-mentioned four propositions will be discussed in detail and refuted one by one relying on scientific and logical arguments.

Quotation of Einstein, cited by Fred Hoyle in ‘The Intelligent Universe’ Richard Dawkins
Bertrand Russell “Religion and Science (Oxford University Press, 1961)
Richard Dawkins in the “God delusion” page 35
Richard Dawkins in the “God delusion” page 34

To be continued

Micro Farming and the ‘Vedic Compost’

Why Ploughing is Detrimental to Health
A comparative study made by Good Gardeners International
(reg. Charity 255300)

Radha Krsna das ACBSP

Note: all comparative photos in this article were taken at the same time in the same year, 2017.

I was walking with the field agronomist on the neighbouring 42 ha. field yesterday at Shenley Park and discussing with him how modern agriculture has bred three fourths of the fertiliser out of their own crops. “How?” he said, “Because they have bred short straw varieties which were originally four feet high” I replied.

Yes, I can remember on my Father’s farm the grain used to sway in the wind up to four feet high and we didn’t have the lodging problem experienced by so many farmers, because they added too much nitrogen trying to always get maximum gain out of the soil.

They claim they have bred short straw varieties to increase yield and because of lodging. This is the falling over of the grain and rotting in the field due to high winds and heavy rainfall. But the truth is that they have tried to exploit too high a yield by adding too much nitrogen. This in turn weakens the plant and the top heavy grain ears weigh down and will collapse when high winds or heavy rains come. Previous long stem varieties did not lodge because they had no artificial nitrogen added and because the soil structure was good and the roots went down to a much greater depth. Today’s root structure and quality of grain, of the modern varieties, leave much to be desired.

The deep mouldboard plough was invented in the west to turn Prairie into arable land. It only needs to be used once to do this, then with proper soil management it is not needed again.

The claim is that heavy land has to be ploughed to lighten it up, to allow the frost in to break up the soil and to improve drainage. After this operation, which incidentally brings up stones from the shale layer, in soils that have a lower shale layer, from the thousands of years natural formation from the rock substrate below and which have unnaturally been brought to the surface. These stones would naturally be converted into top soil by the natural action of time and weather if only left alone. On the surface they form like concrete with the heavy clay that has also been brought up by the plough.

You can order with this link from the UK here. It is essential that you send us your email address and a mobile phone number in order to receive our quoted much reduced postal charges for delivery to your nearest drop shop (UK).

After ploughing which on heavy soils brings clay to the surface too, you have to further cultivate the soil by discing and harrowing and because you have brought so much air into the system you have then to roll it to compress in the seed that you sow, so as to make a good capillary action, or wicking action, to get soil moisture to make contact with the seed. None of this is necessary with the No Dig Good Gardening and farming system.

The opposite is actually true when you plough. You destroy the soil structure and destroy the crumb structure of the soil. The crumb structure is the space between each soil particle that is crushed by the heavy iron plough. (Kali Yuga is the age of iron and steel and concrete) Ploughing with the iron plough also destroys the soil structure, or the soil profile, the delicate formation of channels and pathways created by the myriad of wildlife present in healthy soil and the appropriate layers of decomposing surface organic matter that falls on the surface (Nature). This also destroys the miraculous drainage capacity offered by these creatures. Waterlogging can be the result which kills the roots of plants. Ploughing cools the earth down rather than warming it up, as it exposes the lower layers to the atmosphere and wind and rain get in thus cooling it down. Each half a degree in temperature decrease affects subsequent crop germination. The frost gets in rather than being kept out by the insulating properties of a good mulch cover from the previous harvest which is left on the surface with a dressing of compost. So over winter you get a much colder start for the crops, which slows down germination and inhibits the ultimate harvest potential.

“You should clean the soil after a harvest”. This is the western concept and takes away the valuable worm food that worms thrive on and digest – but they can only do this when it is in a rotten condition. Life comes from Life. And decaying life forms the basis for that which is about to take birth again. (recycling)

Not only that. Earthworms are killed by the heavy metal plough that cuts deep through the soil and turns over the turf to bury the weeds. Birds pick off large numbers too (if worms are present) And if you don’t use weed killer, the plough cuts the weed roots up and spreads them more and more for the coming years. Thus making a toxic carpet of often sour weeds, which do not improve the land, rather they make it sour (Howard) and take away the sweetness that is afforded by good soil management.

Those worms that aren’t killed or picked off by birds have all their worm eggs displaced, which causes chaos in the subterranean world which must be a consideration for a true environmentalist who does not wish to see Nature or wildlife unnaturally disturbed and should be encouraged to proliferate at their natural rate. The saying goes. One year seeded, seven years weeded.

If you plough this again in the spring to get rid of these weeds you will end up with crops smothered and inhibited by even more weeds

This all increases the acidity of the soil and lowers the population of the humble earth worm which is trying to do its natural job in Nature by breeding prolifically by greatly improving drainage and increasing fertility with their worm casts. They also take down decomposing organic matter to the right depth for further decomposition and will survive and breed in profusion if the soil is kept warm and undisturbed.

On our farm we have worms breeding all the year round in our undisturbed soil and we are trying to achieve what Howard called ‘Land in good heart’. Howard worked with Darwin on this and they claimed that you can have as many as 16 million earthworms per acre in really fertile soil.

Agriculturalsciencetellsusthatworms produce five times more nitrogen, seven times more phosphorus and eleven times more potassium than is found in surrounding soil.

(Lady Eve Balfour, The Living Soil, nine editions and co founder of the Soil Association). Providing a mulch cover over winter if it can be found or afforded really warms up the earth even more and you can visibly see the myriad of worm castings under these mulching sheets when they are lifted. So by actively decreasing worms populations by ploughing and cooling down their breeding grounds we are decreasing the natural productivity of the soil. So what do we do? Add tons and tons of cow dung in a raw compressed state with undecomposed straw in it. This is a classic example of overworking the soil (Howard, Lost Science of Organic Cultivation) and expecting it to digest this material and at the same time grow a crop. (Howard) It especially can’t digest this raw material when it is being turned upside down and placed in anaerobic conditions which prevents the faster action of aerobic decomposition above ground. Worms only eat vegetation that has got to a certain state of decomposition. They do not eat living plants or fresh vegetation (Lord Brahma).

The answer to this major dilemma is composting which is the fastest way to get the waste materials including sanitation waste into the right condition to be digested by earthworms so that the next crop can be grown without overworking the soil. With this HH-2 equipment you can include all cooked and uncooked food waste, left over Prasad etc., This all falls within modern day health and safety regulations because the system is rat proof and fly proof and there is no run off.

If you put raw organic matter on infertile soil nothing will happen or if you dispose of it in the woods it will just stay there and attract rats. Fifth Canto says All things from the Earth should be returned to the Earth. But we understand this to mean in the right condition.

Consider the Earth like a child. If you don’t properly feed a child it will not develop into its full capacity. If you feed a child properly it will have full cognitive development and develop to his or her full capacity (Crawford, Institute of Brain Chemistry).

This nutrition will set us up for life and will greatly help us in old age. Good nutrition will ensure we have a far less painful exit from this world. So actually to improve the health of the population who live on the produce of the soil we must not plough it. Ploughing also destroys the mycorrhiza fungi that transfer the nutrients from soil to the root hairs of crops (Dr. Claire Rayner, 1931) Once ploughed this fungi takes two years to re-establish itself (Rodale Institute, USA, 2014). These are the scientific results of compost farming. Also a report by DEFRA, UK, 2007 says that the keeping power of vegetables is dependant upon their mineral content. We have kept courgettes for three months or more.

We see in the ancient literature of India Lord Balaram has been casually leaning on his scratch plough throughout all eternity, this must surely tell us something. It is made easy for us in picture form. He is not pictured holding a mouldboard plough. He is holding a scratch plough. Not only was the scratch plough used for killing demons, but he used it to till the ground to produce grains by trundling over the surface of the ground and Krsna took care of the cows and the milking of the cows. It’s all in the Hare Krsna mantra…. It is said everything is contained within this mantra.

HEALTH
Health comes from the soil. We are what we eat. We read in the fourth canto that minerals and fertilisers come from the hills. This means from extinct volcanoes where there are outcrops of Basalt rock which contain 72 listed minerals and trace elements (Good Gardeners,1968). Today the soils of the world are depleted and lacking in these constituents therefore to replenish soil and our health we must seek out these valuable commodities and engage them in the service of the Lord and His devotees. Otherwise why is this included in the Srimad Bhagavatam? If we treat the soil badly, we treat ourselves badly. Mother Nature is the shadow of the Supreme Lord.

Volcanic rock dust is part of our formulation of HH-4, A PLANT

MEDICINE
We have the backing of spiritual authority (Srimad Bahagavatam) regarding the adding of minerals and fertilisers and not to dig the soil but rather use scratch implements (pictured left). These implements only till the very surface of the soil, thus not destroying soil structure, soil crumb structure or worm drainage channels. This is extremely scientific and Howard called it The Post Graduate study of Agriculture. It is now becoming the prefered method of modern sustainable farmers all over the world.

We also have the material authority… of top London doctors namely professor Michael Crawford who is chair of the Institute of Brain Chemistry http://ibchn.org.uk/team.html and of the Mother and Child Foundation http://motherandchildfoundation.net/
Professor Crawford came to visit our farm with his men and fully supports our methods of agriculture. He ran a hospital in Uganda for thirty years and they were doing a similar system as we are today. He also tells us that they were adding the sewage residues, after processing, back to the land. This is also what Srila Prabhupada said we should do. This is listed in a previous paper. ‘The Tollygunge Compost Factory’. Which was presented to the entire GBC,. in 1995 on my discovery of Howard’s work.

Professor Crawford’s contention is that if the nutritional content of our food decreases, as it has because our soils are depleted, what we can expect is poorer and poorer states of mental health. This he says in his lectures, is the world’s greatest fear. Only by proper recycling and good gardening and agricultural methods can these nutrient levels be reinstated and maintained. The professor’s comment on our farm was “What you are doing is in a sense revolutionary and at the same time traditional.” http://www.themotherandchildfoundation.org/ see this link to HH-2

Crop increases and weed decreases with no digging

Howard always said that you can get 300% increase in crop production with this method of fertility making. This we have seen time and time again on our humble one acre demo farm and it is achieved with surface cultivation for weed control.

If you want to scale this up as I mention in my release of The Lost Science of Organic Cultivation you either need more people or more machines but you can’t do it with neither.


His Holiness Smita Krsna maharaj and

His Grace Gurudas visit the Well End project.

So there we have it. Don’t plough the soil for all these reasons. Because a quick fix to heavy cropping is the desire, regardless to the condition of the land it is on a parallel with modern industrial farming and this is talked about in the famous book by Jacks and White of 1939.

If one man owns hundreds of acres and farms it with one man on a tractor he will make loads of money, only made possible by exploiting the blood of the earth (oil). Because modern civilization is trying to exploit all the resources of material Nature and always get maximum gain by overworking the soil and by adding chemicals (also oil based products) he is not considering the future of fertility IE., for his children and their children. This is the road to starvation. And Howard says ‘the time of reckoning is not far off.’ As soil depletes all over the world by bad agricultural practice and loss of valuable carbon through ploughing – millions of tons of topsoil are lost each year. This will lead to poverty and suffering. People move to cities in vast numbers as they cannot see a way to make a living off the land. This is encouraged by the industrialists and architects etc., This will not help as where is sufficient food going to come from to feed the growing population? It comes from the soil. It is only shortsightedness and the greed to control people, land and seed production etc., that will cause the suffering of the future.

View over our Well End farm

If there is no one to take responsibility for the land and produce food in a sustainable way no amount of intellectuals will save you.

If mankind cannot devise and enforce ways of dealing with the Earth, which will preserve the source of life, we must look forward to a time, remote though it may be, yet clearly discernible when our kind having wasted its inheritance will fade from the earth because of the ruin it has accomplished. (Professor N.S. Shaler, Harvard University, 1896)

The prediction of Lord Caitanya is that the chanting of Hare Krsna will spread to every town and village.

If we do come to understand the importance of the soil as the substratum of all that is living as depicted by the authorities we have mentioned we will be able to prosper both in physical and mental health and have longer in this body to develop our relationship with Krishna.

We hope the word will spread that we are offering this facility to all temples so they can create a space where this kind of farming can go on to produce food of the highest quality that may be offerable to Krsna.

It is our desire as Good Gardeners of the soul and of this planet to help support the Vedic Care Charity (www.VedicCare.org) and provide the devotees of the Lord who have given their lives to serve the mission of Lord Caitanya with a peaceful and caring atmosphere in which they can leave this world and go back to Krsna.

References;
The Living Soil, Lady Eve Balfour, nine editions, 1943, is considered a seminal classic in organic agriculture and the organic movement.

The Lost Science of Organic Cultivation by Sir Albert Howard and Radha Krsna das, 1996 an update of Howard’s earlier work entitled the Waste Products of Agriculture, 1931

The Rape of the Earth, Jacks and White, 1939, references to how ploughing caused the dust bowls of the USA.

Ploughmans Folly, Edward Faulkner, 1951, seven editions
Support by Professor Crawford, President of the Institute of Brain Chemistry and the Mother and Child Foundation, Imperial College London.

Srimad Bhagavatam, Krsna-Dvaipayana Vyasa.

The Success Story of Sudhama Maharaj

By Gurudas,

A gray faced man let Varuna and I into the national hotel.
He buzzed us through a heavy metal latticed door.
We walked up the dingy stairs to the third floor.
The halls were filled with debris, needles, children’s toys, clothes, and a cat wandering aimlessly..

We went to the third floor.
Some of the doors were open, with music, shouts, and various members of humanity inviting us into their dens.

Our mission then was to find Sudhama. Sudhama who loved and served Prabhupad. By now his disease had spread, and he was dying.
Loud sounds music, arguing, people banging on the walls greeted us.
Sudhama’s room was at the end of the hall of many small rooms.

Even though he was sick and dying, his room was meticulous, and everything was in place, there was a bed a small desk which was now an altar, a hot plate in the kitchen area.  His clothes were pressed and grains were in jars/pressed and immaculate, hanging on a pipe.

The window looked onto a a brick alley. Someone was banging on the wall again. Sudhama said “come in”,  weakly when we knocked. He was skinny and emaciated, yet he smiled and perked up when he saw us. He was frightened, his eyes were hollow.


They said “I don’t want to die”. However he was too weak to entertain, and we asked him if he would like to get out of this unsavory hotel. He immediately said yes, and we arranged for him to fly to the Los Angeles Krishna Temple, and into the loving care of Omkara devi dasi. Subsequently the transition in a proper manner and environment.

This is just one instant where I was privileged to be at the bedside or helping a great Vaishnava into Krishna’s care.

Hare Krsna! Jaya Sudhama Maharaj!

A ‘Vedic Care’ Success Story

Hare Krsna dear Gurudas Prabhu,

Please accept my humble obeisances. All glories to Srila Prabhupada!

In August you visited and lived in our house. You gave
a lecture on Harinam, and a few lectures in our
temple in …

My little daughter is ill and our business felt apart. I hope you remember us. I thought of you so many times. I remember how you held my hands and prayed for me while I was crying.

I do not know how to express my thankfulness that you treated me in such a personal and human way. Even from last year my memories were that you are so personal, with you I felt like with my family. Many devotees were nice to me when they found out we were in such difficult time, but for me you are totally extraordinary because I felt extraordinary care and endeavor to understand me and feel with me. Such warmth coming from you.

And I wanted to write you this, that your approach is so deeply carved in my heart. Even if I was not able to meet you again, you left such impression on me that I will remember that till the end of my life.

Thank you for showing us what it means to be a Vaishnava.
I am so grateful I got to know you. Wishing you all the best!

Your servant,
… devi dasi

Devotee’s names and place are omitted for privacy.

Gurudas is the Founder of the Vedic Care Charity ~ www.VedicCare.org

Care of Devotees

By Gurudas

To all Vaishnava devotees,

Prabhupad said “Those who have given their lives for Krishna should be taken care of at the end”.

When I said “Prabhupad sometimes I am sad by the way people treat each other, and sometimes…. Prabhupad replied “Why sometimes, we should always be compassionate.” And he bandaged my foot; himself, in Vrindavan when my foot was cut.

I heard recently a female devotee who gave ten years of full time service to Temples, was neglected by the devotee administrators, and shipped off to her parents who do not support Krishna consciousness and eat meat, etc.

There are too many stories of neglect or even abuse to elders and devotees in general.

Do not turn your backs on aging devotees who have served for most of their life; some for 50 years.
We are not ready to be forgotten.
We are still serving,

Das anu das is one of the main principles Prabhupad gave us. And it works when we perform it sincerely.

Again: “Any one who has given their life for Krishna, should be cared for at the end.”… A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupad.

We at the Vedic Care Cooperative want to provide a model Vedic atmosphere for devotees and other spiritual seekers in need. However we cannot do this in every town and village, so we will assist, teach care, give classes, create more devotee care-giving Out-Reach Teams, etc.; but we really want all of you to take notice and create care places in your temples, homes, etc.

We can be examples of a positive alternative to the Callous apathetic material world, by caring for our own.
Please don’t turn your back!

We could be you,as you are getting older and you never know when you will be in need of care.

Please act on this need, or support our VedicCare.Org.

Truly yours,
Gurudas

A life of service, a death of peace: The story of Manisha

By Bhagavati devi dasi and Ananta Sesa dasa

People face death in many ways. Some accept it stoically, while others fear it. This is the story of a woman called Manisha who faced it with grace, dignity, and the love of Krishna.

Manisha was first introduced to Krishna Consciousness in the 1980s and became a regular at the Radhadesh temple in Belgium. In service to Radha Gopinatha, she happily worked as a cleaner.

For the past twenty years, Manisha lived in Liège, where she distributed prasadam every Wednesday for the FFL program there. In addition, she hosted a bi-weekly kirtan program in her home. Her personal routine included chanting sixteen rounds of japa daily.

Even though Manisha was uninitiated, she did much to share the love of Krishna with others and to bring others to Krishna Consciousness. Sadly, she had one vice that she was unable to overcome—smoking. Throughout her life, she tried to quit many times, without success. The lure of maya was too strong.

In 2016, Manisha was diagnosed with cancer in the bladder and after having an operation, she received chemotherapy. After three treatments, she decided to stop the chemotherapy, since it was making her too sick. She knew that this would ultimately mean that the cancer would kill her, but at the age of 78, she was ready for that.

Her friend, Bhagavati devi dasi was able to help her quit smoking so that Manisha could live out her time with the devotees at Radhadesh. Through Krishna’s mercy, Manisha was able to sell her home in Liege and move to a home near the temple. Feeling inspired by this mercy, Bhagavati wrote to her spiritual master, Kadamba Kanana Swami, and asked him to initiate her. Since she was now following all four of the regulative principles and chanting 16 rounds, he was very happy to do so. With special permission from the local temple authorities and GBC, Manisha was initiated.

After her initiation, she did quite well for some weeks, but then things started to go downhill very fast. She had developed metastasized bone cancer and was in a lot of pain. For the last two weeks of her life, she could no longer leave her bed. After a few days, Bhagavati called in the local palliative care team and requested a home nurse for Manisha.

Recognizing that spiritual care was more important than physical care, Manisha’s friend turned her room into a spiritual place with an altar opposite her bed. Pictures of Krishna adorned the walls, Bhagavati’s salagram sila moved into her room. When Manisha was introduced to Him, it was explained that at the end she would be able to hold Him in her right hand.

A recording of Srila Prabhupada’s japa played most of the time except for when she was listening to Bhagavad-Gita or Caitanya Caritamrta.

On Balaram’s appearance day, Bhagavati purified Manisha’s right hand, put a flower in it and asked for her prayer to Balaram. She asked Him to take her as soon as possible.

The next morning, Manisha was in a lot of pain. A morphine pump was set up to help her manage the pain. The next morning.  Bhagavati recalls, “Manisha was very sleepy and I just sat next to her bed to read to her. The doctor came again at 2 PM and told us that she would have another 24-36 hours. By 3 PM, I was sitting with Manisha together with another devotee and her breathing changed into the laboured ‘death rattle.’ I knew she would probably not have 24 hours, so I called my spiritual master, who happened to be at Radhadesh. He came half an hour later and started chanting for her. There were many devotees in the room with her. Her family was sitting at her left side and I was sitting at her right side armed with Tulasi leaves and Ganges water. I had put my salagram sila in her right hand and she was holding on to Him tightly.”

“We could regularly see her lips move when she was trying to chant with the kirtan”, Bhagavati continued, “At 4:40 PM, she opened her eyes and started staring with huge eyes. At 4:45, she smiled, chanted Hare Krishna and stopped breathing for a long time. I quickly administered the Tulasi leaves and the Ganges water. She breathed one more time and left while her spiritual master was chanting and I was also chanting the mantra in her right ear very loudly.”

In the Bhagavad-Gita (18.66), Krishna says:

sarva-dharman parityaj
ya
mam ekam saranam vraja

aham tvam sarva-papebhyo

moksayisyami ma sucah

“Abandon all varieties of religion and just surrender unto Me. I shall deliver you from all sinful reaction. Do not fear.”

In line with this teaching, Kadamba Kanana Swami stated that since Manisha had given up everything she had in Liège in order to move and leave her body in Radhadesh, Krishna reciprocated.  This act of surrender was her ticket back home to Godhead.

~~~~~~

Manisha’s picture and this article are published with her personal permission. Thank you Manisha for your determination, kindness and example. You’re an inspiration to us. Hare Krsna

All about the ‘Vedic Care Radhadesh’ here.
We’re now planning a VCC ‘Preventive Medicine’ and ‘How to Care’ Seminar for May 2018 in Radhadesh.
Please follow us on FB for all updates.

The ‘Vedic Care’ Retreat in Paraty ~ Brazil

The Yoga & Ayurveda Retreat will be held in April 2018, in English, Portuguese and Spanish.

The Eco-Village and the Hotel Dharma Shala are in the mountainous jungle on the coast of Rio.

The Eco-Village has:
Many waterfalls in the mountains, near gorgeous preserved beaches; vegetable gardens, cows, exotic tropical birds, wild bananas, tropical fruit trees, fresh ‘ahimsa milk’ and a beautiful temple.

The Retreat offers:
Vegetarian and Vegan organic meals
Daily hikes to different waterfalls
Bhakti & Asana Yoga classes
Ayurvedic teachings
Shamanic experiences & Guided meditation
Vegetarian & Vegan Cooking classes
Kirtan (spiritual music sessions)
Herbal/Botanical Medicine/Natural healing
‘Cinema and the Psyche’ workshop
Murals and basic painting workshop

We will also have music and other performances during a bonfire on the last night.

Massages, one to one therapy with the Ayurveda, Natural Medicine Doctors and Counselors, day or half-day visits to the historic town and preserved beaches nearby can be arranged but are not included.

ROOMS ~ SEMINARS ~ PRICES
Seven Days and Six Nights

For Prices, Packages and the booking form to secure your place, please go to here.

Package prices include all seminars and workshops, its certificates and all meals. Not included: Flights and pickup /drop off at the Rio de Janeiro International Airport.  Pick-ups with our Van (12 persons) cost $60 each way.

Seminars/workshops descriptions are here

The location is near the costal town of Paraty, in the Rio de Janeiro State ~ Brazil.

See our amazing location in the video below.


HOSTING AND GIVING SEMINARS

GURUDAS: Shamanic experiences & Guided Meditation, We are the Shaman and Introduction to Bhakti Yoga
ARADHANA DEVI DASI: Introduction to Bhakti Yoga ~ Mantra Meditation
CHAITANYA SWARUP DAS: Ayurveda ~ Self Management of Health Seminar. You will learn a mixture of popular interest and advanced Ayurvedic concepts.
Dr. CAROLLE CHAPMAN: The Healing Power of Herbs ~ Our Friends and Supporters in Life, Health and Healing
Brief Introduction of the ancient use of herbs in all cultures to heal, and Introduction to Bhakti Yoga
MATTHEW JOSEPH MORREALE: Cinema and the Psyche workshop.  ‘Cinema and the Psyche’ is an exploring into the nature of cinema, the psyche and how they interrelate.
JODY VAN BRUNT: Asana & Pranayam. “I believe Yoga starts with the breath, if you can breathe you can do Yoga!”
SUE ANN BECK-RYAN: Murals and basic painting workshop
VEGETARIAN & VEGAN COOKING COURSES: Local teacher
KIRTAN: (spiritual music) bhajan leaders from Brazil

Average Weather in April in Paraty

In Paraty, the month of April is characterized by gradually falling daily high temperatures, with daily highs decreasing by 3°F, from 85°F to 82°F over the course of the month, and rarely exceeding 92°F or dropping below 76°F.

Daily low temperatures decrease by 3°F, from 74°F to 70°F, rarely falling below 65°F or exceeding 77°F.

For further details please visit www.vediccare.org/paraty-retreat

All ‘Vedic Care’ Events are to assist the fundraising of our global endevours and model facility.

The ‘Vedic Care’ ~ An Oasis of Love

Where is the Love and Trust?

by Aradhana devi dasi

I recently watched the great black and white movie by Frank Capra, ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ with James Stewart. Frank said that James Stewart’s appeal was that he was unusually usual; we can’t help but love him and the parts he plays.

In this particular movie, James plays an average guy with great aspirations. Unfortunately, he’s unable to achieve what he sets out to, but in the end, he achieves so much more, and is dearly loved and cared for by the community. It’s very inspiriting. Even God has a voice in the movie and is guiding events; such a rarity in movies today. It’s definitely one I’d recommend.

As a filmmaker, I keep up with what’s happening in the film business, and sadly what the industry has mostly been promoting over the last 30 to 40 years is atrocious. My husband (writer/director) and I (actor/producer) are set to make movies that will inspire again, that will empower and enlighten the masses, in the hopes of bringing them close to God; even if it only reminds them that God is something to actually be considered, it will be a success. We’ve created ~ what we hope will become ~ a great film studio, Yoga-Maya Entertainment.

But why do I ask about the Love and Trust?

‘Love and Trust’ is disappearing from our entire society, and not only from society at large, but even in our spiritual communities ‘Love and Trust’ is becoming very rare. In ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ this ‘Love and Trust’ is real and thrilling.

So what happened to humanity and it’s ‘Love and Trust’?

In my humble opinion, we’ve been bombarded and manipulated by leaders who’ve mostly been trained as lawyers, and whose business thrives by a lack of trust and increased conflict. This, in x trust, and in this way it permeates every culture and society, including the spiritual ones. People are stressed, tired, abused and constantly cheated and cannot therefore trust one another. Without trust, there is no love, and without love, there is no care.

Since the inception of the Vedic Care Charity (www.VedicCare.org) nearly two years ago, the Vaishnava community have been extremely skeptical and some even averse to our Devotee Care endeavor. A few well-wishers and trustees have asked: What is there to be skeptical about? We just want to assist, serve and care for devotees in need, and most importantly, we want to bring back the ‘Love and Trust’ in our hearts and society.

Sadly, and most unfortunately, the VCC is still being challenged today. Serving under these conditions is already hard, before adding the small amount of funds available to lend assistance to all the devotees we know are in need right now; really, it’s not even possible, were it not for the VCC team being full-time volunteers.

The VCC have not only been threatened with unfounded law suits, and been called scammers in online forums, but we’ve received ‘demands’ for open accountability with heavy undertones of accusation. As a charity we comply with all legal requirements, of course, but we’d so much prefer being approached in a more respectable manner; not charged as guilty before even starting.

I was expecting a more personal welcome; somehow, to be given the benefit of the doubt and treated in a caring, more forward thinking way. We never expected being talked to in an incriminatory and threatening way. It’s as if some are just waiting for a little mistake to bring the house down.

On the other hand, when ‘Love and Trust’ is the norm, with all our 1134 ‘likes’ (today) on ‘The Vedic Care’ Facebook page giving a little monthly (sadly not the case at this time), we’d be able to run our website and outreach teams so nicely, giving the reactive and urgent care needed now.

So, we’re left with a few questions still:

Where did the love, care and trust go? How can we relate to one another as spiritual seekers when there’s so much animosity? Have we forgotten that love and trust is actually what makes a community successful? Have we forgotten that love and care is the light that inspires us to truly help one another in times of difficulty?

The Vedic Care Charity will keep going, as we strive to serve Srila Prabhupada and his mission, trusting that we will actually create our VCC model facility; a place to welcome devotees in their later years who are unable to care for themselves. We already have a number of devotees lined up for our model facility in the USA, and we hope to accommodate so many more through the fulfillment of our other wonderful plans.

In closure, I must share our puzzlement, that in almost two years of full-time work, building and promoting the obvious, urgent and real need for care in our society, and that, with high hopes of bringing back the ‘Love and Trust’ the society once had, there have been few sincere inquiries as to the nature of our personal health, spiritual or material needs. Although this is heartbreaking news, we’ll continue, happily and with enthusiasm; confident that Srimati Radharani and Srila Prabhupada will bless us with success in our endevours to manifest this so needed service.

It’s a wonderful life, indeed.

The ‘Vedic Care’ Benefit at Tantris, LA -June 3rd, 2017


An artistic and enlivening afternoon, for the benefit of others

Gurudas (Roger Siegel), Aradhana (Ana Lucia Alves) and Russel Simmons will be welcoming all of you at Tantris on June, 3rd 2017 at 2pm for a exotic and colorful festival, a conversation about spirituality today and the need for a strong spiritual community where all souls are valued, welcomed and cared for.

A Vegan Feast, Exotic Yogic Art, Spiritual Sounds (Live Kirtan) with Clytie Lane Nolte, Bhardraj das and Kausaliya devi dasi, Epic Pictures, Epic Pictures, Pure Incense and Spiritual books will be available for your pleasure and enlightenment. Also a non-permanent tattoo (Mehndi – body art) will be offered.

Spiritual Seekers and transcendentalists often find themselves in financial trouble in their later days, mostly due to their lack of interest in materialistic lifestyles. The ‘Vedic Care’ [VCC a 501(c)3 Charity] main mission is to assist these personalities who have dedicated a great part of their lives to the well-being of others, sacrificing finances, family and friends to be of service. In this spirit, we’re creating spiritually enhanced care facilities and communities, were respect, love and trust are primary.

This ‘Vedic Care’ Benefit Event is to assist the fundraising of our global endevours and model facility. Please see our short promo-video here. Further details on our Model facility here.

For tickets please click here.
Or please Donate Today

For more information on the ‘Vedic Care’ activities, please go to www.VedicCare.org. Thank you.

Hosting the Event

Gurudas (Roger Siegel) – VCC Founder and Trustee

Following his heart, Roger protested injustice by joining the civil rights struggle, becoming a staff member of the Northern Student Movement’s Harlem education project. He was beaten and arrested many times for his beliefs.

He was also on the staff of The Henry Street Settlement, and other community centers. He also worked with visually impaired, mentally challenged and homeless populations.

After meeting Swami Bhaktivedanta and becoming his disciple in April, 1967 (now Gurudas) he was appointed president of the London Temple where he became friends with The Beatles, recording then “The Radha Krsna Temple” album with George Harrison; the album went straight onto the top of the charts.

He was later put in charge of the Krishna Balaram Temple project in Vrindavan. Gurudas then befriended the American ambassador, Kenneth Keating, and procured two tons of food for distribution in the Bangladesh refugee camps. This was the start of “Food for Life”.

Many people have expressed their gratitude for how Gurudas has cared for them, and now we are facilitating the Vedic Care Charitable Trust for more structured and stable care. He is also a photographer, professional counselor and certified Hypnotherapist.

www.Gurudas108.com

Aradhana devi dasi (Ana Lucia Alves)
The ‘Vedic Care’ Co-Founder, Trustee & CEO

Ana left Brazil at nineteen to explore the world and seek spiritual enlightenment. As the great granddaughter of a native Brazilian Shaman, she never could accept mainstream spiritual paths that were so limiting to her sensibilities.

She worked for many years as a top model, actress and documentary filmmaker, learned four languages and achieved great material success. While based in Paris, she studied dramatic arts, got married becaming the “Chatelaine de Miolans’, and gave birth to a baby boy, Theo.

Ana first saw the ‘Hare Krishnas’ in Munich in 1988 and years later she was introduced to the yogic philosophy of Krishna consciousness. She finally joined the movement in Manhattan after receiving Srila Prabhupada’s Bhagavad Gita in 2002. She accepted a Guru and became Aradhana devi dasi.

Today, Aradhana runs a film production company with her devotee husband. She is grateful for this opportunity to serve the spiritual community, helping to bring devotees together to create a health system for assisting all Vaishnavas and spiritual seekers in need.

www.ofindigo.com & www.chantingyoga.com

And

Russell Simmons
Founder of Tantris Yoga, Yogi & Entrepreneur

Born in New York City on October 4, 1957, Russell Simmons began promoting New York City musicians in his early 20s. He partnered with Rick Rubin to create Def Jam Records, and signed artists like the Beastie Boys, LL Cool J, Public Enemy and Run-D.M.C. He later sold his stake in Def Jam to Universal Music Group for $100 million. In addition to his music career, Simmons is an enormously successful entrepreneur and philanthropist. Lately Russell founded Trantis Yoga with its first location in Los Angeles.

www.tantris.com

Our Mission an Model Facility promo-video here.